PFAS in Michigan: What we know and what we need

PFAS are a pervasive group of manufactured chemicals that have been found in Michigan's drinking water. We have outlined a comprehensive approach to address this issue.

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Keep Our Water Clean

We're educating legislators about the need for a strong statewide septic code to ensure public health. Help us by sending an email to your representative now.

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Working For A Healthy Environment

We work with almost 70 organizations to promote public policies that ensure Michigan families will enjoy clear waters, clean beaches, beautiful landscapes and healthy communities for years to come.

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Stop Toxic Algae Blooms

Algae blooms have plagued the state of Michigan for too long. Hold Governor Snyder and the state legislature accountable for protecting our waters by signing this petition.

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Priorities

Our program priorities detail Michigan's opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.

Michigan Environmental Report

Michigan Environmental News

New report demonstrates how coal-fired power plants threaten water quality

LANSING – A white paper released today by the Michigan Environmental Council details the ways in which coal-fired power plants have contaminated Michigan’s Great Lakes, rivers, streams, groundwater and drinking water with toxins like mercury, arsenic and lead. The white paper comes at a time when communities across Michigan are struggling with drinking water contaminated with Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) and other toxic chemicals.

Oil tunnel plan leaves big questions for Great Lakes protection

Gov. Snyder today announced his plan for the 65-year-old pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac, commonly known as Line 5. The state and Enbridge, the company that owns Line 5, made a deal that allows Enbridge to build a tunnel below the Straits. This tunnel would be owned and operated by the State of Michigan, but would be leased to Enbridge for a term of up to 99 years to house the pipeline.

“Line 5 remaining active in its current condition is a threat to the Great Lakes, plain and simple,” said MEC President and CEO Chris Kolb. “The tunnel will take years to build and during that time the risk of a spill from the existing 65-year-old pipeline poses a very serious threat. At any moment, Line 5 could leak 2.4 million gallons of crude oil into the Great Lakes and cause billions of dollars of damage to our waters, coastal communities, and recreational economy.”

Contaminated water in our backyard

Growing up in a community like Rockford, Michigan, it’s easy to take a lot of things for granted. It felt safe and welcoming, and the idea that my family or neighbors could be drinking toxic water never crossed my mind. Then, one weekend while I was home from college, my Mom told me that I couldn’t drink from the tap, explaining why we had an unusually large amount of bottled water in the house.