Michigan Environmental Report

News from Michigan Environmental Council on public policies affecting the health of Michigan's people and environment

Another way to help Flint

We've been getting calls in our office lately from people concerned about the Flint water crisis-folks from as far away as West Virginia and New Mexico-who want to know what they can do to help.

Report finds rapid growth in Michigan solar jobs

Michigan's solar industry employed 2,779 people in 2015, a 32 percent increase from 2014, according to industry data released Wednesday.

Momentum growing in push to keep factory fish farms out of the Great Lakes

Today was a big day in the ongoing effort to protect our fisheries and fresh water by keeping factory fish farming out of the Great Lakes.

Poll finds overwhelming public opposition to Great Lakes fish farming proposals

Michigan residents overwhelmingly oppose proposals to allow commercial fish farming in the Great Lakes, poll results released Tuesday show. The EPIC-MRA poll found that nearly 7 in 10 Michiganders are against opening Michigan's Great Lakes waters to commercial net-pen aquaculture. The opposition cut across geographic, political and demographic lines and increased when participants learned more about the issue.

Health advocates applaud Flint aid, urge continued investment

Health advocates today applauded the Legislature's approval of $28 million in state aid for families impacted by the lead poisoning crisis in Flint, recognizing that the appropriation is only a down payment on what must be a continuing commitment of state resources for the city's recovery.

A look at MEC's policy priorities for 2016

A new year brings new opportunities, and at the Michigan Environmental Council, we're ready to seize them.

Q&A: Michigan Ice Fest evolves from 'a handful of climbers meeting in a bar' to a world-class celebration

After a hesitant beginning, it seems winter is here in earnest. Colder weather might not be everyone's cup of tea, but it's great news for the organizers of Michigan Ice Fest.

California's gas catastrophe raises questions about Michigan's vast storage fields

Editor's note: News of the massive natural gas leak from an underground storage reservoir near Los Angeles made us curious about the implications for Michigan. We knew there were similar storage facilities here, but we've learned that Michigan has more of them than any other state. While state officials say those facilities are held to strict construction and maintenance standards, the California leak raises questions about Michigan's ability to prevent a similar incident here. As we see it, the public safety and climate risks of underground natural gas storage are further cause for Michigan's political leaders to make a strong commitment to clean and increasingly affordable renewable energy sources.